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Podcast: The evolution of the British peppered moth

This week in the Planet Earth podcast, Ilik Saccheri and Arjen van 't Hof of the University of Liverpool describe how the British peppered moth changed from peppered to black during the Industrial Revolution in northern England.

19 Aug 2014

Isotopes reveal the diet of a king

Richard III enjoyed a life of luxury during the brief period between becoming king and perishing at the Battle of Bosworth, an analysis of the chemical composition of his bones and teeth has shown.

17 Aug 2014

Tags: Archaeology, UK

Mycology against malaria

Insect-borne infections take an appalling toll across much of the world, and they're turning up in new places. Tom Marshall finds out how fungi could help us fight back.

15 Aug 2014

Genetically engineered flies could save fruit crops

Fruit crops ravaged by the Mediterranean fruit fly could be saved by genetic engineering, say scientists who have altered the genes of some male flies so they can only produce sons.

13 Aug 2014

Ship noise puts fish in danger

Noise made by passing ships stops eels from using their survival instincts, say NERC-supported scientists investigating the effects of man-made noise on fish.

7 Aug 2014

Taking the environment's pulse

Long-term observation of our ecosystems is critical for us to understand environmental change. Andy Sier looks back on the contribution of 20 years of observation and research by the Environmental Change Network.

1 Aug 2014

Coastal defences could contribute to flooding with sea-level rise

A combination of coastal defences and rising sea levels could change typical UK tidal ranges, potentially leading to a higher risk of flooding, say scientists.

1 Aug 2014

Podcast: Using X-rays to look inside ancient leaves

This week in the Planet Earth podcast, Roy Wogelius and Nick Edwards of the University of Manchester explain how they used extremely bright light from particle accelerators to delve into the chemistry of exceptionally well preserved fossil leaves from the Green River Formation in the US.

22 Jul 2014

Ancient grassland species take a century to return

Old chalk grasslands that have been disturbed by farming can take more than a hundred years to recover their full diversity of plants, new research shows.

22 Jul 2014

Sewage treatment contributes to antibiotic resistance

Wastewater treatment plants could be unwittingly helping to spread antibiotic resistance, say scientists.

21 Jul 2014